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Before You Start Rage-Applying, Read This.




About Rage-Applying


"Rage-applying" is a kind of revenge tactic that refers to the act of applying for many jobs in a short period of time, often motivated by frustration or anger with one's current job. This can be a common response to feeling unfulfilled or unhappy in a job, and it can be a way for people to try to find a new job that they hope will be a better fit for them.


It is likely that people have been applying for many jobs at once out of frustration or anger with their current job for as long as people have been working. It is natural to want to find a new job that one hopes will be a better fit for them or provide a higher salary when unhappy in their current position or organization. Let’s be honest, rarely does anyone apply to only one to two jobs when they are looking to transition quickly, regardless of the circumstances.


The Pros and Cons of Rage-Applying


It is difficult to say how "rage-applying" might specifically benefit Gen Zs and Millennials, however, applying for many jobs at once does increase the number of job opportunities that a person is considered for, which might increase the chances of finding a job that is a good fit. And a new job provides an opportunity to negotiate a higher salary, flexible hours, remote work, and benefits, and acquire new skills.


"Rage-applying" could potentially disadvantage Gen Z and Millennials in several ways. For one, it may lead to many rejections, which can be disheartening and may discourage a person from continuing to look for a job and negatively impact one’s mental or emotional health. In addition, this approach may not allow a person to tailor their applications to the specific requirements of each job, which could decrease their chances of being considered for a position. Applying for many jobs at once can also be time-consuming and may not allow a person to fully research and prepare for each application, which could decrease their chances of being selected for an interview or being offered a job.


Another disadvantage of "rage-applying" is that it may not allow a person to fully consider their options and choose a job that is a good fit for them. By applying for many jobs at once, a person may not have the opportunity to fully research each company or position and consider whether it is a good match for their calling, skills, interests, and career goals. This could lead to a person accepting a job that is not a good fit, which could lead to further frustration and a desire to find a new job.


Another disadvantage that “rage-applicants” need to consider is that employers may view applicants who move from job to job quickly or emotionally in a variety of ways, and the specific response of an employer will depend on several factors. Some employers may view such applicants as unreliable or lacking commitment, while others may be more understanding and willing to consider the individual circumstances that led to the job changes.


It is important to keep in mind that employers are generally looking for candidates who are reliable, committed, and able to contribute to the success of their company. If an applicant has a history of moving from job to job quickly or making job changes based on emotions, it may be important for the applicant to be able to explain the reasons behind these changes in a way that addresses any concerns the employer might have. For example, an applicant might explain that they have learned valuable skills and gained experience from each of their previous jobs, or that they are looking for a job that is a better fit for their skills and interests.


Ultimately, it will be important for applicants to be able to demonstrate that they are reliable, committed, and able to contribute to the success of the company, regardless of their job history. This can involve highlighting relevant skills and experience, demonstrating a strong work ethic, and showing a genuine interest in the company and the specific position for which they are applying.


Things to Consider Before Rage-Applying


Before “rage-applying,” be sure that your “rage” is in response to a more permanent issue rather than a temporary one. Have you spoken up about your frustrations? Have you considered all your options to rectify your grievances with your current employer? Making big life decisions while angry can be risky, as anger can cloud judgment and make it difficult to think clearly and rationally. It is important that employees consider fully the long-term consequences of their decisions, especially when rash.


Overall, it is vital to your reputation, career aspirations, and wellness to try to remain calm and composed when making big life decisions, as this can help to ensure that you are able to think clearly and rationally and to consider all the relevant factors and potential consequences. If one is feeling angry and upset, it may be a good idea to take some time to cool off and gather one's thoughts before making a big decision.


Before "rage-applying", it is important for people to consider the potential drawbacks of this approach and to consider whether it is the most effective way to find a new job. Some things to consider before "rage-applying" include:


1. The importance of research and preparation: Applying for many jobs at once can be time-consuming and may not allow a person to fully research and prepare for each application, which could decrease their chances of being selected for an interview or being offered a job.


2. The value of considering one's options: It is often a good idea to carefully consider one's options and approach the job search process in a methodical and strategic way, rather than applying for many jobs impulsively. This can involve identifying a specific set of jobs that you are qualified for and interested in, and then carefully researching and preparing for each application. By taking a more targeted and strategic approach to job searching, people may be more likely to find a job that is a good fit for them, that they will be happy in, and will be an advantageous career move.


3. The grass is not always greener on the other side: Acquiring a new job due to “rage-applying” may not always land you in a better position or organization. Unfortunately, you will not be sure until the honeymoon phase is over and you are well-settled. Therefore, one must know that the circumstances of your current employer are worth the risk.


The bottom line is that "rage-applying" out of frustration or anger with one's current job, may not be the most effective way to find a new job. While it may increase the number of job opportunities that a person is considered for or land you a job with a $30k salary increase, it could also lead to many rejections, interview burnout, a lack of response from potential employers, and another dissatisfying job. Just be sure that the quick jump to another job does not ultimately cause more frustration and discomfort for you than your current employer.


 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR


Dr. Wanita Mercer, Ph.D. is the founder and CEO of Lead My Heart, an executive coaching and consulting company specializing in spiritual leadership, change, and communication strategies. She has a Ph.D. in Education with an emphasis in organizational leadership from University of the Incarnate Word, and she is a certified change management specialist and management executive. She has over 15 years of experience as an international educator, motivational speaker, and author. She lives in San Antonio, Texas.